A challenge for any Catholic and any apostle is discovering what and how the big mysteries of faith, such as Christ’s Incarnation, not only save us, but also should and can transform our daily life and vision. So, let’s take give it a shot by taking a look at this video.

What’s the big shocker when it comes to Christ’s Incarnation? He assumed our nature. He didn’t flip a switch or say, “Aba kaduh” and magically remedy things. Rather, he saved by drawing near, by inserting himself completely into our nature, our lives, our existence. The Fathers of the II Vatican Council said it clearly and beautifully:


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… His incarnation the Son of God has united Himself in some fashion with every man. He worked with human hands, He thought with a human mind, acted by human choice and loved with a human heart. Born of the Virgin Mary, He has truly been made one of us, like us in all things except sin. (GS, 22).

With that in mind, let’s take a look at the video. According to a Catholic vision, charity isn’t only about putting the check in the basket or throwing a few dimes in the hat. Both are good, but we are missing something vital. Charity means stepping into the other person’s shoes. It means stepping out of our comfort zones and diving into their world. It means sitting next to them, taking their simple bucket, and revealing to them that what they considered to be simple and perhaps of little worth is, in reality, a rockin instrument that was meant to be played and heard (Don’t miss the look on his face when they first start to play!)

Christ revealed to us what it means to be human by his Incarnation. He stepped inside to our world, reconciled it by dying for us on the Christ, brought about new life through his resurrection. This too is the apostolic path: the incarnational jump, the death to oneself so that the other may life (the money goes to the guy on the street not the performers), and the birth of new life in charity.


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Remember, we don’t serve from afar, we serve but jumping in. And once we are there, eye to eye, we say, “Check this out.” And then we show them the beauty of the Church, the harmony of Her unity, the sweet purity of Her songs, and the warmth of Her friendship.

Questions For Dialogue

What does the mystery of the Incarnation teach us about doing apostolate? What

What Christ-like attitudes can be found in the video?

How do you live this in your own life?