“The Skinny On Fasting” – A Funny Video On A Serious Christian Discipline

by Funny, Lent, Meaning of Suffering

Have you been fasting this Lent? Sure, it’s a struggle, but this ancient, scriptural, necessary Christian discipline is something Jesus expected and which Catholics for hundreds of years took as a given. (Check out our Illustrated Guide to Fasting) You’re not supposed to like it or be good at it… but, take heart! We do it for joyful reasons! The feast must be proceeded by a fast, or else we miss something essential to the feast. This is a hilarious video from skitguys.com: a great discussion starter on fasting.

The Skinny On Fasting | Skit Guys

Ok, so obviously the video is satire, but we’ve probably experienced some blend of the personalities it depicts (whether among people we meet, or even in ourselves!). But, on a more serious note, we love these thoughts from Pope Benedict XVI, spoken during Lent, 2009:

“In our own day, fasting seems to have lost something of its spiritual meaning, and has taken on, in a culture characterized by the search for material well-being, a therapeutic value for the care of one’s body. Fasting certainly brings benefits to physical well-being, but for believers, it is, in the first place, a “therapy” to heal all that prevents them from conformity to the will of God. In the Apostolic Constitution Pænitemini  of 1966, the Servant of God Paul VI saw the need to present fasting within the call of every Christian to “no longer live for himself, but for Him who loves him and gave Himself for him … he will also have to live for his brethren” (cf. Ch. I). Lent could be a propitious time to present again the norms contained in the Apostolic Constitution, so that the authentic and perennial significance of this long held practice may be rediscovered, and thus assist us to mortify our egoism and open our heart to love of God and neighbor, the first and greatest Commandment of the new Law and compendium of the entire Gospel (cf. Mt 22, 34-40).

“The faithful practice of fasting contributes, moreover, to conferring unity to the whole person, body and soul, helping to avoid sin and grow in intimacy with the Lord. Saint Augustine, who knew all too well his own negative impulses, defining them as “twisted and tangled knottiness” (Confessions, II, 10.18), writes: “I will certainly impose privation, but it is so that he will forgive me, to be pleasing in his eyes, that I may enjoy his delightfulness” (Sermo 400, 3, 3: PL 40, 708). Denying material food, which nourishes our body, nurtures an interior disposition to listen to Christ and be fed by His saving word. Through fasting and praying, we allow Him to come and satisfy the deepest hunger that we experience in the depths of our being: the hunger and thirst for God.”

Lent Resources

QUIZ: What Should You Give Up For Lent?
A Guide To The Best Catholic Lent Resources
How to Discern Between Consolation & Desolation | Lenten Spiritual Exercises
A Guide To The Best Catholic Lent Resources
How to Discern Between Consolation & Desolation | Lenten Spiritual Exercises
3 Questions To Examine Your Heart During Lent
The One BIG Thing You Are Probably Not Doing For Lent (And Why You Should)
How To Go Into The Desert: Entering The Wild, Scary, Interior Battle Of Lent
12 Pieces Of Advice That Revolutionized My Lent
12 “Pope Quotes” To Reflect On As We Approach Mid-Lent
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