After so many sufferings, diseases, troubles and pains, let us return humbly to that One Being. Let us enter into that city whose inhabitants share in Being itself.

St. Augustine of Hippo

Brethren, do our years last? They slip away day by day. Those which were, no longer are; those to come are not yet here. the former are past, the latter will come, only to pass away in their turn. Today exists only in the moment in which we speak. Its first hours have passed, the remainder do not yet exist; they will come, but only to fall into nothingness…Nothing contains constancy in itself. The body does not process being; it has no permanence. It changes with age, it changes with time and place, it changes with illness and accident. The stars have as little constancy; they change in hidden ways, they go whirling though space… they are not steady, they do not possess being.

Nor is the human heart any more constant. How many thoughts disturb it, how may ambitions! How many pleasures draw it this way and that, tearing it apart! The human spirit itself, although endowed with reason, changes; it does not possess being. It wills and do not will; it knows an does not know; it remembers and forgets. No one has in himself the unity of being…. After so many sufferings, diseases, troubles and pains, let us return humbly to that One Being. Let us enter into that city whose inhabitants share in Being itself.

Source: Commentary on Psalm 121, 6.